Rejection is different now, ECRs need more support

by Jenny Pickerill, Professor of Environmental Geography, University of Sheffield

In light of the recent trend to #ShareYourRejection on twitter, meant as a way to encourage others to persevere in their chosen profession or passion, I was struck by what that really meant in academia. While I know it is good to share our rejections (and I do), my experience of early job rejections means little now. Fourteen years ago, when I applied for my first lectureship, was an entirely different market. Casual teaching posts were rare. I got a permanent lectureship without any articles published, let that sink in for a minute… I secured a permanent academic job in Geography at Leicester University, having never published a journal article.

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What is to be done? Seven practical steps for historians

by Brodie Waddell, Lecturer in Early Modern History, Birkbeck, University of London

(This post first appeared on the Many-Headed Monster on September 21, 2015.)

I’m very grateful to all of you who’ve already offered your thoughts on how we can improve the history profession. I agree with most of the comments on my previous posts on academic employment and practical responses – in fact some of the suggestions below are borrowed from those comments. However, I promised that I would offer my own tuppence so here I’ll try to set out some steps that we can take individually or collectively. Most of these are quite minor, but hopefully they are a good start. They aren’t in order of priority, but the first four are generally about gathering and publishing information and the rest are about more direct action.

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