Rejection is different now, ECRs need more support

by Jenny Pickerill, Professor of Environmental Geography, University of Sheffield

In light of the recent trend to #ShareYourRejection on twitter, meant as a way to encourage others to persevere in their chosen profession or passion, I was struck by what that really meant in academia. While I know it is good to share our rejections (and I do), my experience of early job rejections means little now. Fourteen years ago, when I applied for my first lectureship, was an entirely different market. Casual teaching posts were rare. I got a permanent lectureship without any articles published, let that sink in for a minute… I secured a permanent academic job in Geography at Leicester University, having never published a journal article.

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An Anxious Mind

by Nadine Muller, Senior Lecturer in English Literature and Cultural History, Liverpool John Moores University

(This post first appeared on Nadine Muller’s blog on October 2, 2012.)

We all worry. Some occasionally, some more often than others, some rarely. Being a worrier, or an anxious person, is not necessarily a problem. It becomes an issue, however, when you find yourself unable to switch off, feel content, or focus; when your head is permanently filled not only with thoughts but with worries about what you need to do next and what you have (not yet) done, and what the consequences of this are. From the moment you wake up to the second you fall asleep, your head spins with daunting fragments of task lists, personal worries, and the imagining of bad things that have not happened, and are not likely to. The result of this state of mind can vary between at least two behaviors; some people experience both in turn, some only encounter one throughout their lives.

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